Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Stereotypical Images And Old Brickwork Courts Law Essay - Free Essay Example

Manchester Minshull Street Crown Court was very much the stereotypical image of a court, complete with the old brickwork, the large courtrooms with lots of polished wood, and of course, the gowns and the wigs. In comparison, Manchesters Civil Justice Centre was much more modern, consisting of lots of glass and lots of floors. Although in the civil court it was only possible to view small claims trials, in the crown court, it was possible to observe part of a trial with a jury (the defendant was accused of engaging in sexual acts with a minor) and a case of assault which ended with a plea-bargain. Here, both courts will be considered for their differences and similarities, to try and find out how accurate perceptions of the law are. Two observations stood out in the Crown Court; firstly, the number of staff involved both in and behind the scenes of the proceedings. Although in every case, there will be a judge, solicitors or barristers (in some cases both) and in certai n circumstances a jury, the court room is a much busier place than first envisioned. For example, there will be the clerks of the court keeping the procedure running smoothly (e.g. escorting the jury in, swearing in witnesses) and there will be the security officer (who will escort the defendant in and out of the courtroom when required), as well as other staff members who keep the process going. Before the Judge is called, and the court is in session, there are constantly people walking in and out of the courtroom, usually counsel or other members of the court; sometimes a change of plea is issued at the last minute, and a scheduled trial by jury no longer takes place, or the court staff are confirming details of the case. Indeed, among the staff that dont constitute as counsel or the judiciary, the upcoming case is often discussed, bringing everyone up to speed before the case is called into session. A court trial procedure isnt simply the job of the lawyers and the judge as commo n perceptions might have one believe. Secondly, there is a lot more waiting around than anticipated. Trials and hearings do not always take place in one sitting, and they do not even have to be completed on the same day. As aforementioned, more often that not (and certainly more often than initially believed), a scheduled trial will no longer take place, usually due to a change in plea. The case surrounding assault initially was going ahead as a jury trial, but just before the case was due to be called into session, the defendant changed his plea to guilty, which meant a trial was no longer needed. Lord Devlin once described the jury as the lamp that shows freedom lives  [1]  . However, in reality, very few cases are tried by a jury. Only a small minority of cases are ever brought to trial, of which even fewer are actually tried before a jury, and during the visits to the Crown Court (which as it is only represent 2% of criminal trials  [2]  ), only one of the cases ob served was brought before a jury. The jury itself in this instance could be considered as ethnically varied; although mostly white, there was (as far as could be seen) at least one juror from an ethnic minority, and the jury covered both genders in a roughly 2:3 male to female ratio. There was also a noticeable age variation among the jurors, from the estimated age of a university student to the estimated age of a pensioner. As a whole, the jury seemed to be quite involved in what they were doing. Some were paying close attention to the monitor to their left (at that time displaying video evidence) and others were taking notes. Of all the jurors, only the one who appeared to be a student seemed reluctant to be involved in the whole process. Although the way the judge directed the jury both at the beginning of the process and at the end wasnt observed, his instructions during the process were clear, helpful and authoritative, especially when setting up the video call and when d irecting them as to the procedures during their break. Even though issues were discussed between the judge and the both counsels during the jurys absence, when they returned, the judge kept them informed of what had been said, keeping everyone organised and up-to-date. On the whole, in the Crown Court cases, most of the judges did fit with the stereotypical image in terms of age, gender and race: in all the cases observed, all were older white males, and all wore the traditional gowns and wigs anticipated by the public majority when in a court room. However, on the courts daily procedures listings, it was noticed that although the majority of judges were indeed male and of the ranking of Circuit Judge (supporting government statistics that 87.6% Circuit Judges are male  [3]  ), there was a singular female judge listed (although she had the ranking of Recorder rather than Circuit Judge, where females only make up 13.68% of the total  [4]  ). In a similar light, there too w ere few judges from ethnic minorities, and those that there were from an ethnic minority had the status of a Recorder (6.02% of the total number of Recorders come from an ethnic minority  [5]  ). In all, the judges in all the criminal trials and proceedings observed didnt appear to have become case-hardened and cynical as proponents of a jury-based system will have people believe. The judges seemed willing to keep an open mind throughout the case and were friendly to everyone both during the proceedings and the time in between. In a case of assault, when the judge was giving his final statements, he took a moment aside from the case to thank the defendants mother (the defendant was a black male teenager, seemingly conforming to stereotypes) for coming to the trial. He went on to explain then about how many similar cases hed tried and how often the family of the accused actually bothered to go to the proceedings, so he was glad that the mother would still support her son. Alth ough not strictly law related, this feature of this one trial was surprising and challenged common perceptions that judges are stereotypically harsh and unfeeling. This was especially the case with young offenders in specific circumstances in the case of assault, the defendant was initially defending himself from attack and took the defence too far. One of the most interesting aspects of the Crown Court was the use of video-calling to interview a witness. This was most likely due to the fact the material witness was a fourteen year old girl, who for various reasons could not be present within the courtroom itself. A video-monitor was situated near to the jury and another was situated in view of the whole court, and these were used to both hold the video-call and to observe video evidence. The judge himself was in control of the call, echoing his authority. This case also interesting due to the fact it shows how serious evidence is taken by the judge although only fourteen, the witness was still required to be sworn in and how important tangible evidence actually is for a criminal trial. Unlike the proceedings in the Crown Court, the proceedings in the Civil Court had a much more restricted access, mostly due to the nature of the cases. A vast majority of the cases brought before a Civil Court are family proceedings, which means they are conducted in private, and this restricted the number of cases available for viewing. As of April 27th 2009, the restriction on journalists who wished to attend family court hearings was lifted, allowing for more proceedings to be heard publicly, but they are not given automatic access to court documents and reporting restrictions still remain in place, including the total ban on reporting Children Act proceedings and hearings concerning the maintenance and upbringing of a child  [6]  , even if this means nothing to the public majority. In comparison, in the Crown Court, where the cases are of a criminal nature, the re are no restrictions on members of the press being present during any trial or case, even if the case itself is not open to the rest of the public  [7]  (which would only occur in cases of national security or cases of a highly sensitive nature). Out of the cases observed in the Civil Court, not one involved the use of a jury. Jury trials in civil courts are now very rare, and are restricted to cases of fraud, libel and slander, malicious prosecution and cases of false imprisonment. It too can be said that unlike in a magistrates or a crown court where their job is to determine the truth and validity of a case based on the evidence brought before them, in a civil court, their job is to base their decision on the balance of probabilities. During one of the small claims trials in the Civil Court, neither party had a fully qualified representative for their counsel. The defendant defended himself, and eventually lost the case partially on the basis that he didnt really seem to understand the legal process (i.e. the procedure required for witness statements or how to ask witnesses questions that were actually relevant to his case) and as a consequence couldnt defend himself adequately. The judge constantly had to reiterate and qualify what he meant or what he was asking, which made the process much longer than maybe it needed to have been. In comparison, the claimant was in the process of taking the BVC and had previous experience within his company of similar cases, even if he wasnt yet qualified, and so had a much greater understanding of what was going on (he was able to include cases which constituted precedent for his argument and he understood how the whole process worked, such as addressing the judge and using the specific terminology). This seems to suggest that the case wasnt as understandable to a lay person as to someone who has some understanding of legal issues and terminology. In the Civil Court, there was a much greater use of precede nt than in the Crown Court, supporting the prior observation that a civil case is decided on a balance of probabilities rather than on the basis of the validity of evidence presented (e.g. cases include Lumley v. Green  [8]  , OBG Ltd v Allan  [9]  ). This isnt to say that evidence isnt used in a Civil Court or isnt equally as important, but it emphasised the extent to which a criminal trial is mostly based upon evidence which is unique to a certain case. A civil trial is different in that the specifics dont matter quite as much as the way similar cases have been settled in the past. The proceedings in the civil court were a much more continual process, or at least in the small claims trial the proceedings were more continuous. Whereas as aforementioned, the criminal trials involved a lot of sitting around, the cases in the civil court werent interrupted once, with the entire case laid out before the judge and then his decision being made at the end of the proceedings (in one case, his decision to issue damages to be paid by the defendant). However, these small claims trials arent fully representative of all the proceedings in the civil court, despite making up a large percentage, and it must be acknowledged that proceedings in full trials of other matters may indeed have been much different. Indeed, whilst waiting for a small claims trial to come into session, many counsel were observed walking around the courthouse, dressed in the traditional gowns, so whilst there were no wigs or gowns in the small claims trial, this doesnt mean they arent used in a trial in a higher court. The same therefore can be said about the proceedings what goes on in a lower court in front of a district judge may not be the same as one in a High court. Similar to the Crown Court, the judge in the small claims trial was male, however didnt fit into the stereotypical image of a judge he was Asian, fairly young and didnt wear any of the traditional gowns. Unlike the Cro wn Court too, he was referred to as Sir rather than Your Honour, which implies that the proceedings in this type of court case are a lot less formal than perhaps in a criminal trial (e.g. the members of the court werent required to stand when the judge entered) or even a civil trial in a High Court. So although he could potentially be viewed as holding a lower rank, this is not due to his ethnicity a High Court Judge simply isnt required to sit in on such a minor issue and there was no way of determining the race of the other judges in session. In the same light, there was no way to determine whether or not there were any female judges in session, or their rank, simply due to the trials available to see. Despite this, there were plenty of female staff, usually in administrative roles or acting as counsel, most noticeable acting at the clerk of the court. However, unlike in the Crown Court, she left almost immediately, leaving very few people in the courtroom as proceedings unfolded . The organisation of the civil court seemed to be a bit lacking, with proceedings being held up due to a lack of judges being in attendance or simply because parties involved were still trying to settle before their case was brought into session. In the same manner, cases which are scheduled do not always go ahead as planned as a defendant in a criminal trial will change his plea, so too can parties in a civil trial settle before they go before a judge which meant there was a lot of waiting around for proceedings to begin. This seems counter to the claim that a civil courts principle objection is the avoidance of delay and the minimisation of delay if it cannot be avoided entirely  [10]  , especially in light of the judges power to adjourn hearings at their discretion. In conclusion, many common perceptions surrounding court procedures are actually unfounded, both in the civil area and in the criminal. There are many more similarities in the different courts than origin ally perceived, but there are also some differences that were unexpected, such as the formalities of procedure and the amount of people actually involved in the different court processes. However, despite their similarities, the two types of court are very different in their nature (such as the types of cases they deal with) and these difference are obvious from watching the different proceedings.

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Poem Analysis Heaven, And Bryan Thao Worra s Poem ``...

In this literary analysis it is essential to compare and contrast Cathy Song’s poem â€Å"Heaven† and Bryan Thao Worra’s poem â€Å"Pen/Sword† to give the reader a better understanding of what the authors’ are conveying to their readers. The similarities in the style, word choice, and theme will be compared, along with the differences of style, word choice, and theme reflected throughout each poem. Furthermore, I will determine the meaning behind the broken up and/or the way the lines of each poem while describing why the lines are strategically placed throughout the pieces. This will allow me to identify the meaning that the authors’ are explaining to the reader. Each poet specifically writes to give the reader(s) a picture of what they are feeling and defining their emotion through their writing. Discussion Baym et al.’s (2012) gives us a poets writing that is entitled â€Å"Heaven.† Cathy Song is an Asian American poet who is the speaker in this first person poem. Song exemplifies the romantic spirit by evoking reminiscence and separation. In the poem, a woman who is disconnected from her Chinese heritage longs for her familial homeland that she has never seen. She is amused by her son’s notion that when we die we’ll go to China. She expresses her disbelief of where she currently resides but wants to imagine that she is in China where her ancestors are from. This is seen in lines 12-15: I’ve never seen it. It’s as if I can’t sing that far. But look— on the map, this black

Sunday, May 17, 2020

Toni Morrisons Beloved Not a Story to be Passed On...

Toni Morrisons Beloved: Not a Story to be Passed On Beloved, Toni Morrisons Nobel Prize winning novel, is a masterfully written book in which the characters must deal with a past that perpetually haunts them. This haunting, in the form of a twenty year old ghost named Beloved, not only stalks them in the spirit, but also in the flesh. Beloved, both in story and in character hides the truth in simple ways and convinces those involved that the past never leaves, it only becomes part of who they are. This contortion of truth does not allow any character to escape. Each one hides and runs from the brutality of slavery, yet cannot escape its heritage. Set in the post-Civil War era of the rural Ohio back roads, each protagonist†¦show more content†¦She succeeded in killing one; she tried to kill two others. She hit them in the head with a shovel and they were wounded but they didnt die. And there was a smaller one she had at her breast. She had placed all of the value of her life in something outside herself. That the woma n who killed her children loved her children so much; they were the best part of her and she would not see them sullied. She would not see them hurt. She would rather kill them, have them die. (Taylor-Guthrie, 207-208). The same publication that leads Morrison to conjuring up the characters and the story of Beloved also surveys the horrors of slavery in the mid 1800s. Morrison dedicates the book to Sixty Million and more(Morrison, i) slaves and acknowledges the freedom that each slave yearned for. This freedom constitutes having the ability to chose ones own responsibilities and loving other people more than you love yourself. (Taylor-Guthrie, 195-196). Morrisons characters stand in for all those slaves and former slaves who were unceremoniously buried without tribute or recognition. As she feels chosen by these slaves to attend to their burial properly, artistically, Beloved becomes her effort to accomplish that. It is an act of recovering the past in narrative, to insert this memory that was unbearable and unspeakable into the literature. (Furman, 80). Even Morrison finds it hard toShow MoreRelated slaverybel Morrison’s Beloved as Chronicle of Slavery? Essay1105 Words   |  5 Pages Morrison’s Beloved as Chronicle of Slavery?nbsp;nbsp; Stories written in our present time about slavery in the eighteen-hundreds are often accepted as good accounts of history. However, Toni Morrison’s Beloved cannot be used to provide a good chronicle in the history of slavery. While writing about black female slaves and how they were the most oppressed of the most oppressed, Toni Morrison, herself as a female black writer, has a very bias view, as seen by many others. Beloved is written inRead More Comparing the Role of the Ghost in Morrisons Beloved and Kingstons No Name Woman972 Words   |  4 Pagesthe Ghost in Morrisons Beloved and Kingstons No Name Woman The eponymous ghosts which haunt Toni Morrisons Beloved and Maxine Hong Kingstons No Name Woman (excerpted from The Woman Warrior) embody the consequence of transgressing societal boundaries through adultery and murder. While the wider thematic concerns of both books differ, however both authors use the ghost figure to represent a repressed historical past that is awakened in their narrative retelling of the stories. The ghostsRead MoreAnalysis Of Toni Morrison s Beloved 1524 Words   |  7 PagesShai-Dae Alford Dr. DuBose ENG 490-02 10 April 2016 Slave Narrative: Beloved Toni Morrison conveys her strong feelings in her novel about slavery depicting the emotional impact slavery has had on individual mainly the centered character Sethe. The protagonist of the novel is unable to fully prosper in life due to resentment and the ability to move on from her past experiences. In Morrison’s story, since 1873 slavery was abolished for ten years in Cincinnati, Ohio. By the author choosing this settingRead MoreToni Morrison s Beloved, The Bond Between A Mother And Daughter1540 Words   |  7 PagesLove transcends to a spiritual level, allowing for a more intimate connection with the family. Nevertheless, terrible events can blur this concept between being healthy or dangerous. In Beloved, by Toni Morrison, the bond between a mother and daughter is a strong, unbreakable force, like in any family. However, that doesn’t guarantee that it will always be good; it can also be a toxic relationship that slowly kills one or both partners of the bond mental ly and physically. Everyone wishes to be lovedRead MoreSlavery And Social Criticism In Toni Morrisons Beloved1999 Words   |  8 PagesToni Morrison’s Beloved was not intended to stand alone as a story and novel; a standalone novel iswill be relevant, meaningful, effective and moving regardless of anything going on outside the world that the author has created. Beloved does not stand alone because it doesn’t render the world outside the novel unimportant; it is so integrated into the context of its time period and the one we live in now that to separate the book from its surroundings would be counterintuitive, and the primary messageRead MoreAnalysis Of Toni Morrison s About Slavery2573 Words   |  11 PagesToni Morrison conveys her strong feelings in her novel about slavery depicting the emotional impact slavery has had on individual mainly the centered character Sethe. The protagonist of the novel is unable to fully prosper in life due to resentment and the ability to move on from he r past experiences. In Morrison’s story, since 1873 slavery was abolished for ten years in Cincinnati, Ohio. By the author choosing this setting it had a great impact on the reader like myself. â€Å"I didn’t see her, but aRead MoreThe Fate Of Twisted Love1604 Words   |  7 Pages Mr. Levy English III 16 November 2016 The Fate of Twisted Love Toni Morrison uses the theme twisted love in Beloved to show symbolism on her past versus her in the present. I. Beloved A. Some believe that she was Sethe dead daughter 1. â€Å" †¦as she sees the actual flesh of Beloved Sethe disappears into the bond with Beloved†¦ Denver sees that something must be done.† (Demetrakopulos 75) 2. â€Å"†¦ Beloved was the reincarnation of the daughter she lost initially fils her with joy andRead MoreAnalysis Of Beloved By Toni Morrison2078 Words   |  9 PagesAn Analysis of Beloved as a Portrayal of American History Toni Morrison’s 1988 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Beloved is clearly a work of well deserved literary acclaim. It has been hailed as one of the most revolutionary, poetic, and poignant pieces of modern American literature. The work is characterized by it’s portrayal of the â€Å"Slave Narrative† and follows the strife of former slave and mother: Sethe as she is tormented by the memories of her past, the haunting of her home, and the appearanceRead MoreEssay about Memorys Ghost in Beloved1576 Words   |  7 PagesMemory’s Ghost in Beloved â€Å"A moment lasts all of a second, but the memory lasts forever†- Anonymous In Toni Morrison’s Beloved, the concept of memory is so intertwined with the novel that it is becomes a character; like any character it has impulses, it breaths, it moves, it pushes action forward, and it prevents it; if repressed it sometimes fights; it gives life, and attempts to take it away. Memory and identity are inseparable and interchangeable; what happened in the past becomes not onlyRead More Remembering the Disremembered Essay4818 Words   |  20 Pageshas claim, she is not claimed. In the place where long grass opens, the girl who waited to be loved and cry shame erupts into her separate parts, to make it easy for the chewing laughter to swallow her all away. It was not a story to pass on. - Toni Morrison, Beloved To write history means giving dates their physiognomy. - Walter Benjamin For philosopher, essayist and critic Walter Benjamin, history is catastrophe. Standing as he does at the dawn of World War II and reflecting back

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Frank Leahys Coaching Philosophy Vs. Stacey Darnleys...

Frank Leahy’s coaching philosophy vs. Stacey Darnley’s Biography Shake down the Thunder- The Official Biography of Notre Dame’s Frank Leahy was written by Wells Twombly. This book was written to perpetuate the life of the legend Franky Leahy and to tell his story of how he fought not to die until his mission was complete. Francis (Frank) Leahy was born August 27, 1908 and died June 21, 1973. He was one of the greatest coaches to ever coach NCAA Division 1 College Football. Frank Leahy was second best to Knute Rockne who he played for, both men Coached at the University of Notre Dame. Leahy coached a total of 13 seasons as a head coach-including two at Boston College. During his coaching career he compiled a record of 107 wins, 13 losses, and 9 ties for a .892 percentage. He had six undefeated seasons, four national championships in seven years holding onto a 39 game winning streak. Frank is the only coach to coach four Heisman Trophy winners. He also had the honor of coaching Vincent Lombardi along with many other successful players through out his coaching career. The legend Frank Leahy was inducted into the College Football Hall of fame in 1970. Coach Leahy was married to Florence Reilly and they had eight children together. Leahy’s son and grandson followed in his footsteps and also played football at Notre Dame. In 1966 Leahy started to get sick he suffered from leukemia and arthritis in his spine. He had a rare case of leukemia, so rare that only 9 cases had ever been

Women During The Revolutionary Era - 1857 Words

â€Å"Fighting†¦.maybe for freedom, but probably not† was an indication of just how â€Å"revolutionary† the Revolution War era was for women. As America was going through a new estate with the legacy of the revolution, and striving for a new national governance, opportunities arose for both men and women. During the revolutionary era, woman showed achievements in war and education. Although, women developed a new consciousness that increased opportunities to influence public life, it was often limited and ridiculed by women’s traditional roles to society. The American Revolution signified a period that was rich in debates about the nature of the government as well as the rights of citizens. It generated changes in the principles, opinions, and†¦show more content†¦According to DuBois, â€Å"This European intellectual movement emphasized the rights of individual, the role of reason, the promise of social progress, and the importance of the scientific method† (DuBois, pg. 125). Although, the appreciation for the rights of individuals were questioned, would it apply to both men and women? Surprisingly, women of were able to make some great contributions, however, they had their limitations. This is shown during the taxations that the French put on colonials. The taxations that were put on tea, household items, and cloth would became the biggest burden on women, as consumers. The events arose women’s political consciousness and gave them an opportunity to voice opinions on the burdens place on them and their neighbors. Therefore, women resisted these new polices by boycotting British goods. Instead of using imported cloth they began creating their own, and they also began using herbal teas and coffee. Women of the time finally saw an opportunity where they exert some political influence and they took it. They took much pride in their work because they actually thought that they had finally had an opportunity to exert a political influence. In New England â€Å"the spinning bees’ were popular for manufacturing yarn and free white women called themselves â€Å"Liberty’s daughters†. They were recognized in newspapers and women

Factors of Small Business Management

Question: Critically Evaluate the factors which may affect SMEs ability to establish and maintain successful relationships with business customer? Answer: Introduction The report identifies the factors affecting the small and medium sized enterprises to maintain the relationship with the business customers. The small and medium sized organizations play a major role for the economic growth of a country. Customers and the market are the essential factors affecting the business of SMEs (Chittithaworn et al., 2011). Factors affecting SMEs to maintain relationship with Business customers The small and medium sized organizations are organization with simple structures and there is access to limited resources. The factors affecting the organization to maintain successful relationship with the business customers are discussed below. 1. Social cultural background of the SME The personal characteristics of the owner of the business gives rise to error in relationship with the business customers. The failure of the small and medium sized organizations depends on the way the owner of the organization manages the performances of the organization without having social and cultural prejudices.2. Management Inadequacy Inadequacy of the management is one of the major factors affecting the business relationship of the SMEs with the customers. The inexperience of the management and the incompetence hampers the business relationships.3. Impact of globalization Globalization has enlarged the business activities. This has affected the performance of the SMEs in maintaining business relationship. There has been significant rise in the competitive pressure on the SME. It is difficult for the SMEs to adapt to the corporate culture which has adverse impact on their business relations (Factors Affecting E-Business Adoption by S MEs in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Exploratory Study from Nigeria, 2006). Conclusion The economic growth of a country is largely dependent on the performance of the SMEs. They are also the major contributors of the GDP of the country. They face certain issues in maintaining business relationship with customers in the competitive scenario of business. References Chittithaworn, C., Islam, M., Keawchana, T. and Muhd Yusuf, D. (2011). Factors Affecting Business Success of Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand.ASS, 7(5). Factors Affecting E-Business Adoption by SMEs in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Exploratory Study from Nigeria. (2006). 1st ed. [ebook] p.320. Available at: https://www.irma-international.org/viewtitle/18909/ [Accessed 11 Mar. 2015].

The Rocking Horse Winner Essay Research Paper free essay sample

The Rocking Horse Winner Essay, Research Paper The Rocking Horse Winner Lucky. That? s what this whole narrative is approximately, being lucky. It seemed that to be successful in this society you had to hold a certain sum of fortune about you to be able to do money to last. Paul seemed to be the first to recognize it when he asked his female parent # 8220 ; why wear? T we keep a auto of our ain? Why do we ever use Uncle? s, or else a cab? # 8221 ; When she replied that it was because they were hapless he asked why and she said # 8220 ; Because your male parent has no luck. # 8221 ; I believe it was from this conversation that he realized that to be rich you had to be lucky, what he could non calculate out was how you got lucky. His female parent thought you had to be born with it but Paul was convinced that he could happen his ain fortune. His thrust to happen fortune was fueled by the susurrations that he heard throughout the house # 8220 ; There must be more money. # 8221 ; He thought that if he found fortune he would be able to do adequate money to do the susurrations stop. His method of seeking for fortune was instead unusual and finally led to his ruin. While everyone was traveling about their regular concern Paul would sit like loony on an old rocking Equus caballus he had in his sleeping room. He thought that if he rode long plenty he would finally happen fortune. Finally it seemed as if Paul found what he was looking for, he developed a wont of wagering on Equus caballus races. When his Uncle noticed that he was acquiring really lucky at taking whom the victor would be ( even if there were large odds against a Equus caballus, Paul would wager on it if he thought it would win ) he approached his nephew about his lucky run. Paul said that all he did was sit his swaying Equus caballus until something in his cap ut told him who the victor would be. His Uncle did non oppugn his methods and finally started wagering on the Equus caballuss that Paul did. They went on life like this for a long clip with Paul siting his Equus caballus until he knew the victor and so they would do more and more money off his determinations. When Paul was older there were a twosome of races where he did non cognize who the victor would be and he got truly disquieted. He should hold been happy with the money that he had but he had become obsessed with gaming and winning money so he rode even harder on his swaying Equus caballus. When the biggest race of the twelvemonth came around he rode his Equus caballus all dark like a lunatic, for that is what he had become. He finally knew who would win but ended up deceasing during the dark without holding been able to bask the 80 thousand lbs that he had won for being # 8220 ; lucky. # 8221 ; As you can see, the repeating subject in this narrative was luck, a thing some people call a gift but in this instance it ended up being a expletive. Paul did turn out to his female parent that you could happen luck but what he did non recognize so was that there would be a terribl e monetary value to pay for it. The Rocking Horse Winner Lucky. That? s what this whole narrative is approximately, being lucky. It seemed that to be successful in this society you had to hold a certain sum of fortune about you to be able to do money to last. Paul seemed to be the first to recognize it when he asked his female parent # 8220 ; why wear? T we keep a auto of our ain? Why do we ever use Uncle? s, or else a cab? # 8221 ; When she replied that it was because they were hapless he asked why and she said # 8220 ; Because your male parent has no luck. # 8221 ; I believe it was from this conversation that he realized that to be rich you had to be lucky, what he could non calculate out was how you got lucky. His female parent thought you had to be born with it but Paul was convinced that he could happen his ain fortune. His thrust to happen fortune was fueled by the susurrations that he heard throughout the house # 8220 ; There must be more money. # 8221 ; He thought that if he found fortune he would be able to do adequate money to do the susurrations stop. His method of seeking for fortune was instead unusual and finally led to his ruin. While everyone was traveling about their regular concern Paul would sit like loony on an old rocking Equus caballus he had in his sleeping room. He thought that if he rode long plenty he would finally happen fortune. Finally it seemed as if Paul found what he was looking for, he developed a wont of wagering on Equus caballus races. When his Uncle noticed that he was acquiring really lucky at taking whom t he victor would be ( even if there were large odds against a Equus caballus, Paul would wager on it if he thought it would win ) he approached his nephew about his lucky run. Paul said that all he did was sit his swaying Equus caballus until something in his caput told him who the victor would be. His Uncle did non oppugn his methods and finally started wagering on the Equus caballuss that Paul did. They went on life like this for a long clip with Paul siting his Equus caballus until he knew the victor and so they would do more and more money off his determinations. When Paul was older there were a twosome of races where he did non cognize who the victor would be and he got truly disquieted. He should hold been happy with the money that he had but he had become obsessed with gaming and winning money so he rode even harder on his swaying Equus caballus. When the biggest race of the twelvemonth came around he rode his Equus caballus all dark like a lunatic, for that is what he had bec ome. He finally knew who would win but ended up deceasing during the dark without holding been able to bask the 80 thousand lbs that he had won for being # 8220 ; lucky. # 8221 ; As you can see, the repeating subject in this narrative was luck, a thing some people call a gift but in this instance it ended up being a expletive. Paul did turn out to his female parent that you could happen luck but what he did non recognize so was that there would be a awful monetary value to pay for it.